33.3 C
Belgrade
Supported byspot_img
spot_img

Poland asks CJEU to reject halting of Turów coal mine

Member of Europium Groupspot_img
Supported byspot_img

In February, the Czech government decided to take Poland to the court in connection with the building out of the Turów opencast mine. The main justifications were the mine’s impact on cross-border regions, reduction of the level of groundwater, and as a result lack of drinking water in the region.

Poland has requested the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) to reject a Czech motion to halt mining at the Turów lignite mine.

The Czech government had applied to the CJEU for the implementation of interim measures to stop the mining of lignite at the colliery, which is on the Polish-Czech border, citing environmental concerns.

Supported by

Poland’s Ministry of Climate told PAP that Warsaw’s response to the Czech government’s request had been forwarded to the court on April 6. In its response, the Polish government argued that interim measures are disproportionate and do not ensure a proper balance of interests.

“The application (of interim measures – PAP) would expose the Republic of Poland and its citizens to significant and irreversible harm,” the Polish authorities argue. “Halting mining activities at the Turów colliery until the issuance of a verdict terminating the main proceedings would have severe economic, social and environmental effects for the Republic of Poland, including the country’s energy security.”

The climate ministry pointed out that Poland also believes that the Czech Republic’s request does not fulfil the necessary urgency criteria.

Poland argues that the Czech government’s position is unjustified as the Czech government analysis omits other significant factors.

The Turów mine and power station belong to the PGE Mining and Conventional Energy company (PGE GiEK). In 2020, the mine’s lignite mining licence was extended until 2026.

In the opinion of PGE GiEK President, Wioletta Czemiel-Grzybowska, on the EU court’s decision on Turów rests the future success of the ‘just energy transformation’ at the EU level.

“‘Wild’ energy transformation is extremely dangerous and stands in opposition to the planned, stable and just transformation foreseen by the EU within the framework of the Green Deal,” she said.

The Turów mine delivers 7 percent of electricity used in Poland. Closing the mine would also entail closing the Turów power plant that it supplies, threating up to 80,000 Polish citizens.

Source: thefirstnews.com

 

Supported byElevatePR Digital

Related News

Euro Manganese advances with successful commissioning of high-purity manganese facility

Euro Manganese Inc. has successfully completed the commissioning of its high-purity manganese Demonstration Plant at the Chvaletice Manganese Project in the Czech Republic. This...

Euro Manganese Inc. receives approval for Environmental Impact Assessment and appoints Project Director

Euro Manganese Inc. is pleased to announce the approval of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) for the Chvaletice Manganese Project by the...

Advancements in European Metals Holdings’ Cinovec project in Czech Republic

European Metals Holdings provided an update on the progress of the Cinovec Project in the Czech Republic, owned by its subsidiary Geomet, focusing on...

Czech Republic, Environmentalists plan to turn to international courts for help following Poland’s decision to prolong mining until 2044

Poland has authorized prolonging coal mining in Turow, near the Czech border, until 2044, the Czech Environment Ministry confirmed. Environmentalists criticized Poland’s decision, saying that...
Supported by
Supported by
Supported by
error: Content is protected !!